The circular economy interventions Australia must take to address climate change

Late last month global circular economy organisation Circle Economy released their latest edition of the Circularity Gap Report, an initiative that aims to measure the state of the world economy from a circular perspective and identify key interventions to transition to a more circular model. Let’s deal with the most concerning aspect of their findings first. In 2018, when the first gap report was released, Circle Economy established that the global economy was just 9.1 per cent circular, already indicating a huge gap between the amount of resources we extract and what we effectively recover. Rather than increasing the amount of materials we reuse and recycle, however, the 2020 Gap Report found we have gone backwards.

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Nine out of ten consumers have never heard of the ‘circular economy’

Nine out of ten consumers have never heard of the concept ‘circular economy’, a new survey has found. The results, collated by The Pull Agency, reported that 87% of UK consumers do not know the term for the economic system, which is aimed at eliminating waste, despite 88% claiming to look for sustainability credentials when shopping for beauty and personal care products. In addition, only 9% of respondents said they have sent a jar back to a manufacturer for refills and only 14% have used a refill service, even though 15% of shoppers want more in-store refill stations to reuse existing containers.

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Circular Economy: A Explainer

In 2013, people around the globe bought more than 1.8 billion mobile phones. But now, nearly half of them are most likely in landfills or at homes, sitting there without any use, as their owners upgrade to newer versions. Imagine, however, if these devices went back to the manufacturers once their lifespan came to an end in order to be turned into new mobile phones. How much would that save the manufacturer in terms of raw materials and time? Or what would be the result if these devices didn’t have to be replaced because they were easily repairable and upgradable? This is what could be called a “Circular Economy” approach, a new model of production and consumption that thinks of our impact on the environment and our society as a whole.

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How Your Solvent Waste Plays A Critical Role In The Circular Economy

Pouring solvents down the drain may be an easy way to dispose of them, but this act can be a costly mistake for your business.  Many solvents are considered hazardous waste, and with that designation comes a host of regulations you must follow for proper disposal.  What many companies may not realize, however, is that solvent waste still plays a valuable role in industry even when they are spent or no longer can be used. In fact, solvent waste plays a critical role in the circular economy, a viable alternative that manufacturers are exploring as they look for ways to save costs and improve their sustainability. 

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African Development Bank takes steps to accelerate the circular economy in Africa

With an initiative funded by the KOREA-AFRICA ECONOMIC COOPERATION (KOAFEC) focused on waste management, the African Development Bank aims to accelerate the circular economy in Africa, a model which aims to minimise waste and maximise value from resources through the recovery and regeneration of products at the end of their typical service life.  The rationale for the initiative, entitled “Development of a Green Growth Investment Program in Africa focused on waste management and the circular economy,” is that waste management constitutes one of the major developmental challenges for Africa. It has serious potential consequences in terms of environmental quality, public health, fisheries, agriculture, and sustainable development. The expected outcome of the KOAFEC intervention is a stronger enabling environment for sustainable waste management and circular economy activities. This will be delivered through an enhanced policy and regulatory framework, capacity building and resource mobilization activities.

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The circular economy in action on a bustling street in Maroochydore

In a conversation with The Fifth Estate before Building Circularity, chief executive and co-founder of Coreo, Ashleigh Morris, delved into her passion for accelerating the transition to a circular economy, how she elevated a busy street out of its waste woes, and why food scraps should be the new way of creating energy. Starting out at the hyperlocal level, on a grungy coastal Queensland street, businesswoman and conservationist Ashleigh Morris has built a growing circular economy consultancy that’s now collaborating with Lendlease, Mirvac, Rio Tinto, universities and the Brisbane and Sydney councils.

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Why it’s time to start planning for the circular economy

Discussions around the circular economy are increasing. The concept, an economic model that encourages continuous reuse of materials to minimise waste, has been described by Gartner as starting with “good design, end of life and raw material reuse in mind”. It is not simply a theory, either. Back in February 2020, the analyst revealed that 70 per cent of supply chain leaders are planning to invest in the circular economy in the next 18 months. The likes of Maersk, Caterpillar, IKEA, Philips Lighting, Rolls Royce, Timberland and Nestle are all developing circular economy initiatives, while others are building dedicated departments and hiring talent to specifically drive related projects.

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The circular economy of plastics

The concept of the ‘circular economy of plastics’ means that plastic is viewed as a material that can be reused, to avoid depleting natural resources. This is a concept and economic model that Mondelez Philippines supports, in line with its goals towards zero waste to nature by 2030. The phrase “May pera sa basura” has long been heard in the Philippines. Newspaper drives and glass bottle collection initiatives are common measures to recycle. The same process can apply to plastic packaging.

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Is The Circular Economy Primarily A Transport-Based Economy? Analysis

As brand owners seek to enhance their values-led positioning, innovative logistics solutions can play a major role, says James Ash, head of EMEA communications at Manhattan Associates. More informed and demanding than ever, consumers are now imposing iron-clad expectations on brands in the form of environmental and sustainability credentials. With the boom in e-commerce, the transition to a circular economy is becoming even more important. The final delivery of this utopian, sustainable model, however, is largely based on the efficiency and innovation of transport networks.

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Dezeen and Tarkett present a live talk on the circular economy

Dezeen partnered with flooring brand Tarkett to host a live discussion with Perkins and Will about how architects and suppliers can support the circular economy and help create carbon-neutral buildings.
Titled The circular economy: a journey towards carbon-neutral buildings, the talk explored why the industry should be moving towards a circular model.
A circular economy is a model that minimises consumption, overuse of finite resources and the destruction of ecosystems, by instead continually reusing materials.
Read the full article at: www.dezeen.com

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What is the circular economy, Jan Huitema, MEP

Jan Huitema is a Dutch politician and Member of the European Parliament (MEP) from the Netherlands since July 2014. He is a member of the People Party for Freedom and Democracy, part of Renew Europe. He was re-elected in 2019. During his first term from 2014 until 2019, Huitema was a member of the AGRI Committee, where he served as rapporteur on fertiliser products and water reuse. During his first term he worked on a change in the definition of animal manure and prevention of the patenting of plant-properties. In 2019, he joined the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety.

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7 Ways the Circular Economy Will Grow in 2021

The idea of  a circular economy—one in which materials are used in a closed loop, running on renewable energy—is gaining traction, and many companies are setting goals to become circular in the next few decades. The coming years will be crucial in solidifying the growing circular economy. Here are seven trends that are likely to help it expand in 2021. More Brands Will Employ Reusable Packaging. A growing number of companies are rethinking product design to avoid disposable packaging. Startups like Blueland and Everdrop now sell cleaning products in the form of tablets that can be dropped in reusable bottles. Bite sells tiny toothpaste tabs so it can avoid the standard plastic tubes.

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Growing the Circular Economy: Opportunities for Resource Recycling under China’s Carbon-Neutrality Target

For the first time, RMI has examined the vast potential for resource recycling in China and shown how it can serve as an important component of reaching the nation’s zero-carbon goal. Growing the Circular Economy: Opportunities for Resource Recycling under China’s Carbon-Neutrality Target [PDF] quantifies the market opportunity across nine key segments, from scrap steel and plastics to biomass and EV batteries, finding a ¥2.8 trillion potential market in 2050.

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How Waste Disposal Is Moving Towards The Circular Economy

If you could design waste out of your business, would you?  Increased sustainability, cost savings and reduced consumption of natural resources … these are just a few of the benefits companies see when they convert waste to energy rather than use traditional waste disposal methods like landfills and fuel blending. For companies that generate hazardous waste, in particular, keeping their dangerous waste out of landfills helps protect the environment while giving them a competitive edge. These companies aren’t few and far between. In fact, the push toward a waste-free economy is catching on as more companies are embracing a circular economy, an economic system that focuses on eliminating waste and the unnecessary use of resources.

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Turbine maker Vestas takes a spin into the circular economy

Intelligent re-use of hundreds of mammoth end-of-life turbine blades got a boost today, as European wind engineers Vestas spun into recycling. The Aarhus -headquartered engineer has fabricated over 1,000 blades at its UK base on the Isle of Wight, and recently hinted it may soon confirm up to 2,000 new jobs in the North East.    It supplies blades of up to 110 metres to projects worldwide, including SSE Renewables’ 1GW Seagreen park off the Angus coast. The company announced today a breakthrough in technique for recovering for second use the epoxy materials used to fabricate the giant structures.  Vestas leads CETEC – Circular Economy for Thermosets Epoxy Composites – , a circle of chemical engineers, academics and manufacturers.

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Adidas Releases Recyclable Sneaker For The Circular Economy

The fashion industry has been coming under fire in recent years for its environmental impact. Not only does the industry have a large carbon footprint, but many of the materials it uses are damaging for ocean environments. Sustainability has become a key concern for conscious consumers, and this has been having a knock-on effect on brands. Adidas has already made efforts to address its environmental impact by using recycled PET plastic in its products, and now it has made another step forward by releasing its first totally recyclable shoe.

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Arts and the Circular Economy: Visual Arts

Welsh Government circular economy strategy, Beyond Recycling, aims to move Wales to become a zero-waste, net-zero carbon nation that uses its fair share of resources and seizes the economic opportunities from the transition to a circular economy. The move to a circular economy, which aims to keep products, components and materials in use for as long as possible, is central to the country’s post-Covid response and green recovery in Wales, as well as its commitment to achieving a net-zero economy by 2050.  The strategy requires all sectors of the community to participate including art and art organisations. This article will look at the relationship between fine art and sustainability and in particular the circular economy through the work of visual artists and specifically will look at works that incorporate materials that would normally be discarded as a resource rather than a waste.

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Is landfill part of the ‘Circular’ Economy?

The Circular Economy is where materials are reclaimed from end-of- life products and recycled or re-used back into the same product. This is claimed to be the way of the future and the best approach to a sustainable economy. Avoidance of waste going to landfill is a key part of the Circular Economy. In this …

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The Circular Economy Diagram Explained

The circular economy diagram is a visual representation of an economic model that could be important for American businesses moving forward.
Although we have relied on a “take, make and dispose” model since the dawn of the industrial revolution, globally industries are facing a major challenge. Resource depletion is a legitimate concern as commonly used resources such as natural gas, phosphorous and even water are approaching distressing levels.  A circular economy diagram illustrates the restorative or regenerative properties of a model that redefines growth and focuses on keeping materials at their highest value and continuously in use.  

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AZEK Cracks Recycling Code for Post-Consumer PVC Building Materials

Many plastic-based building materials that could be recycled aren’t, because most companies haven’t yet figured out how. The AZEK Company cracked this code, and diverted nearly 300 million pounds of waste from landfills in 2019. Every time an office building or an old home is demolished, all of the broken-down materials have to go somewhere. The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 230 million to 530 million tons of construction waste are produced annually — and much of that material ends up in landfills. The bulk of construction and demolition waste is old bricks, masonry, concrete, wood and metal; but it’s not exclusively that. Some plastic-based building materials — such as windows, flooring and decking — that could be recycled aren’t, because companies haven’t yet figured out how to collect and reuse the plastic at the heart of these products.

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