Greenpeace chief warns of ”greenwashing” at UN climate talks | Science-Environment

The head of environmental group Greenpeace on Thursday warned against efforts by countries and corporations at the forthcoming U.N. climate talks in Glasgow to “greenwash” their ongoing pollution of the planet.  The summit hosted by Britain has been described as ” the world’s last best chance ” to prevent global warming from reaching dangerous levels, and is expected to see a flurry of new commitments from governments and businesses to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases.  But climate campaigners say behind-the-scenes lobbying before the summit could hamper efforts to achieve an ambitious deal that would ensure the world stands a chance of capping global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) as agreed in Paris in 2015.

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Improved Design of Recycling Machines Nearly Doubles Supermarket Customers’ Recycling Rates

Finnish manufacturer Tomra makes “reverse vending machines” to accept can and bottle deposits for recycling. These types of machines typically accept one vessel at a time, with an internal scanner classifying each one as it comes down the chute. Even in eco-conscious Scandinavia, not everyone is willing to spend those minutes feeding the machine.  The Old Way – In a bid to increase recycling, Tomra designed their new R1 model to be “multi-feed.” The R1 has an opening the size of a clothes dryer, so recyclers can just dump their entire bags inside. The R1’s internal system quickly scans up to 100 bottles at once, and spits out the redemption receipt in seconds rather than minutes.

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SPC Advance 2021: Shifting Perspectives on Sustainability and Climate Change | GreenBlue

Sessions in the policy track included quick overviews of the history of EPR and the concept of individual producer responsibility (IPR), deep dives into eco-modulation and packaging consultations, and panel conversations on engaging stakeholders in policy development and the role of container deposit systems. The diversity of session topics speaks to the complexity of packaging policy and the many considerations that contribute to effective legislation. Dominic Hogg, Director of Equanimator, discussed the realities of EPR in driving improved recycling rates. He recognized that improving rates depends not only on well-written policy, but also on all the other initiatives at varying levels of government that support waste collection and infrastructure.

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Low global copper supply imperils climate goals, Freeport CEO says | Headlines

Adkerson, who also chairs a global mining industry trade group, described the political situation in Washington as a “head-scratcher.” Biden officials understand the importance of copper to climate goals, Adkerson said, but are not likely to lessen mine permitting standards “because that just runs against the grain of their political situation.” Copper prices meanwhile are up 10% this month due to that low supply, with analysts expecting demand will increase alongside the global economy. RISING COSTS Freeport itself is not immune to that price rise.

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D-Wave Embraces Gate-Based Quantum Computing; Charts Path Forward

Earlier this month D-Wave Systems, the quantum computing pioneer that has long championed quantum annealing-based quantum computing (and sometimes taken heat for that approach), announced it was expanding into gate-based quantum computing.
Surprised? Perhaps we shouldn’t be. Spun out of the University of British Columbia in 1999, D-Wave initially targeted gate-based quantum computing and discovered how hard it would be to develop. The company strategy morphed early on.

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Plants Hundreds of Trees as Part of “Growing Day” Environmental Sustainability Effort

Vyne, a recognized leader in end-to-end health information exchange and electronic healthcare communication management, hosted earlier today a company-wide “Growing Vyne Day.” The event took place across more than 20 states with in-person tree plantings in Indianapolis, Knoxville, Atlanta, and Kansas City and virtual events for remote employees in cities across the country. More than 100 employees participated in the event as part of the company’s drive to support global change and sustainability. In addition to donating time and resources to plant trees, the company’s medical, dental, and insurance payer businesses provide technology platforms that enable clients to reduce paper and consumption of other natural resources.

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Kerry Releases Plant-based Dairy Alternative Toolkit

There is great market potential in the plant-based dairy alternative category, with innovation in beverages, frozen desserts, and vegan slices, and more. To help companies and startups stand apart from the crowd, Kerry has released a Plant-based Dairy Alternative Toolkit. This virtual toolkit is designed to give innovators in the U.S. simple, scalable, and sustainable solutions to help with plant-based food and beverage product development and growth prospects. “Emerging and innovative plant-based brands and products need straightforward expert assistance, a road map to scalability, and a focus on sustainability—which Kerry’s 2021 proprietary research says is important to 75% of consumers in this category,” said Elizabeth Horvath, Vice President of Marketing at Kerry North America, in a press release.

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Chemists develop a fundamentally new mode of adsorption

A research team, led by Northwestern Universitychemists, has made a breakthrough in surface science by introducing a new active mechanism of adsorption. Such adsorption-based phenomena, in which molecules are attracted onto a solid surface,are essential for today’s catalysts, energy storage and environmental remediation. The research demonstrates how artificial molecular machines — wholly synthetic molecular components that produce machine-like movements — grafted on surfaces can be used to recruit molecules actively onto these surfaces at very high concentrations, thereby storing significant amounts of energy.

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Sustainability

Steel is a low cost material with high tensile strength, which is why you can find it in just about every bridge you cross. Steel girders, cables, and rebar have become the standard building blocks of bridges over the last 70 years. Bridges made with steel turn into bridges made with rust, and bridges made with rust become structurally deficient very quickly. As stated above, there is already $123 billion worth of backlog work for bridge rehabilitation to mitigate structural deficiency. This cost does not account for any costs related to replacing these bridges in the near future. It is time for a more sustainable bridge option. 

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Why your food company needs to speak the language of sustainability | FCC

Former NHL player TJ Galiardi totalled 44 goals and 105 points during his decade-long hockey career, but his most important assist might ultimately arise from his work in food processing sustainability.  Along with business partner Dr. Darren Burke, Galiardi created Outcast Foods, a Dartmouth, Nova Scotia-based company that upcycles surplus or past-date fruits and vegetables it sources from food processors, grocers and farms.  When consumers are increasingly attuned to everything from a company’s carbon footprint to where the materials for its products are sourced and how those products are made, Outcast is becoming a champion for sustainability.

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Animal-free product era —

The fashion for «conscious» consumption drives the majority of buyers to the idea of replacing animal products with technological progress. The grocery basket choice varies based on the personal capabilities of the body or environmental conditions, as well as compassion for the animals.  As a result, not only will plant-based products continue to displace other positions from stores, but there will also be tremendous innovations in the generation and laboratory cultivation of cellular meats, seafood and dairy products.  This article touches on meat products. According to the Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, the demand for meat in 2050 will double, and the ability to produce enough food will simply be impossible.

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Beetaloo Basin Traditional Owners alleged Origin”hung up on” them

Traditional Owners say the resources company attempting to frack in the Beetaloo basin hung up on them and ignored their questions at the company’s Annual General meeting on Wednesday.  Traditional Owners and Native Title holders including Aunty Naomi Wilfred, Aunty Gillian Limmen and Alawa Elder Aunty May August attended Origin Energy’s Annual General Meeting via teleconference.  The group intended to voice concerns about what they call a lack of free and informed prior consent for the resources company’s fracking project on their Country.  They said they were shown “disgraceful” disrespect by those conducting the meeting.  Aunty May was allegedly hung up on when she reached the front of the queue and moved to the back of the queue.

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Plastics to outpace coal’s greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 -report

The carbon-intensive production of plastics is on pace to emit more greenhouse gases than coal-fired power plants within this decade, undercutting global efforts to tackle climate change, a report released on Thursday said. The report by Bennington College and Beyond Plastics projected that the plastic industry releases at least 232 million tons of greenhouse gases each year throughout its lifecycle from the drilling for oil and gas to fuel its facilities to incineration of plastic waste. That is the equivalent of 116 coal-fired power plants.  “The scale of the plastics industry’s greenhouse gas emissions is staggering, but it’s equally concerning that few people in government or in the business community are even talking about it,” said Judith Enck, a former Environmental Protection Agency regional administrator and president of Beyond Plastics. Also, the report found that petrochemical facilities tend to be clustered in just 18 largely low-income and minority communities, where 90% of the pollution occurs.

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University of Glasgow – Schools – Adam Smith Business School – Events – 25 October. Business of Sustainability

The global climate crisis we are facing is impacting society, business and our environment. It is widely accepted that there needs to be radical change to the way we do business with an immediate focus on the next decade. We need to put in place more sustainable systems, that will allow us to meet the climate change targets set by the Paris Accord. Across the globe, businesses, both small and large, are making changes to the way they function to reduce their carbon impact and operate in a manner that will allow them to remain investible.  This event will look at BT’s climate action journey. Having set its first carbon reduction target in 1992, BT was one of the first companies in the world to set a science-based target aligned to a 1.5 degree pathway.

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Sustainable Great Lakes: A Regional Assessment of Sustainability in the Binational Great Lakes Megaregion – The Council of the Great Lakes Region

For over fifty years, governments around the world, including in Canada, have discussed the importance of sustainability or sustainable development.  One of the more prominent undertakings was the Rio Summit in Brazil in 1992, which led to the creation of Agenda 21.  Subsequently, the Millennium Development Goals were adopted by the United Nations in 2000, which were then followed by the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015.  While these global forums and commitments have made a difference in putting economic prosperity and environmental conservation on a more equal footing, the international community routinely fails to achieve the sustainability priorities it has set for itself. As a case in point, we are unlikely to achieve any of the 17 SDGs by the target date of 2030.

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Glasgow showdown: Pacific Islands demand global leaders bring action, not excuses, to UN summit #COP26 #auspol #ClimateCrisis Demand #ClimateAction #SDG13 #Act4SDGs #FundOurFutureNotGas #NoNewCoal –

Pacific island nations have shaped the international response to climate change. At the United Nations summit in Glasgow, they’ll draw a line in the sand.  Chair of the Pacific Islands Forum, Fiji prime minister Frank Bainimarama, has said Pacific island countries ‘refuse to be the canary in the world’s coal mine.’   The Pacific Islands are at the frontline of climate change. But as rising seas threaten their very existence, these tiny nation states will not be submerged without a fight.  For decades this group has been the world’s moral conscience on climate change. Pacific leaders are not afraid to call out the climate policy failures of far bigger nations, including regional neighbour Australia. And they have a strong history of punching above their weight at United Nations climate talks – including at Paris, where they were credited with helping secure the first truly global climate agreement.

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PA Environment Digest Blog: Knouse Foods Cooperative, Alliance For The Chesapeake Bay, DCNR Partner On Riparian Buffer Planting In Adams County

On October 21, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn joined Knouse Foods Cooperative officials, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, and a host of partners for the kickoff of a streamside forest buffer planting at the fruit grower owned cooperative operations in Biglerville, Adams County.  The planting is designed to improve the water quality of an unnamed tributary to the Conewago Creek, and eventually the Chesapeake Bay.

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Science News Roundup: Patagonian fossils show Jurassic dinosaur had the herd mentality; Vikings crossed the Atlantic 1,000 years ago and more

Scientists said on Thursday the fossils include more than 100 dinosaur eggs and the bones of about 80 juveniles and adults of a Jurassic Period plant-eating species called Mussaurus patagonicus, including 20 remarkably complete skeletons. Big John – named after the owner of the land where the dinosaur’s bones were found – roamed modern-day South Dakota more than 66 million years ago.  Goodbye, Columbus: Vikings crossed the Atlantic 1,000 years ago – Long before Columbus crossed the Atlantic, eight timber-framed buildings covered in sod stood on a terrace above a peat bog and stream at the northern tip of Canada’s island of Newfoundland, evidence that the Vikings had reached the New World first. But precisely when the Vikings journeyed to establish the L’Anse aux Meadows settlement had remained unclear – until now.

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Green finance roadmap sets out sustainability expectations | ICAEW

HM Treasury has published its roadmap for the transition to a greener financial system. Importantly for the accountancy profession, it sets out plans for implementing sustainability disclosures. Large businesses must report on their green credentials to the investment community, says the UK Chancellor. With a whole chapter on getting the right information to market participants, ‘Greening Finance: A Roadmap to Sustainable Investing’ focuses on ensuring the UK’s ambitious climate-change targets are not only written into law, but the financial system that will support the transition is equipped to play its part.

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